Faith is Fight

Faith is fight in the face of fright,

When froward, fearsome foes to light

Come forth and blight the path of Right

Til Justice seems so out of sight.

Faith is founded not in gods,

Gleeful giants playing odds,

But from the Light that lingers lightly,

Loosed by Love til shining brightly

From the depths of human hearts

That witness evil, break apart,

And, showing faith, decide to start

The journey to

The world a few

Know we can view

If we dare to

Begin anew and see it through.

Thanks for Reading! Be Blessed!

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Why Stand?

Why stand?

Why speak?

Why fight the flow?

Why debate how things should go?

Why the anger?

Why the grief?

Why grapple, toil sans relief?

Why the tears?

Why suffer pain?

Why pay the bill for Other’s gain?

Why not float?

Why not drift?

Why not deny the growing rift?

Why have I heart if not to feel?

Why shouldn’t I make justice real?

Why should I turn my eye away?

Why should I heed what you would say?

Wait…

Why do you seem so okay

With leaving Others

In dismay?

Thanks for Reading! Be Blessed!

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Time to Act

Hello, lovely Reader!

I appreciate how many of you read and respond to my work, so first off, THANK YOU!

As a Quaker, matters of justice and equality mean a lot to me, so I am asking you, dear reader, to follow this link and sign the petition in favor of the People’s Response Act.

This bill is a way to reimagine public safety, focus on restorative and equitable justice, and heal causes as opposed to punishing symptoms.

If you feel led, please sign the petition on the website and contact your representatives in support of the People’s Response Act!

It’s time to act,

No time to waste.

Don’t make Justice wait,

Make haste!

Thanks and Be Blessed!

Include Us

Peace and Justice are intertwined

And if one remains undermined

The other will still elude us.

We must be sure to include us.

As we deny one another,

And as we exclude each other,

We, too, leave ourselves behind and

Have no place on which we can stand.

So if you want enjoy Peace,

And want your fears to be released,

Ensure that each has a fair share.

Let Justice be done ev’rywhere.

Thanks for reading! Click here to check out Sacred Days, my book of poems!

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Hope is Power

Hope is power

In such an hour

When all our Love seems to be soured.

For Justice, fight

‘Til all is right,

Yet never let Hope out of sight.

Take hold of Joy;

Delight, employ,

That Hope may thrive, not be destroyed.

The road is long,

The rival strong,

Yet this is right where we belong:

Side by side,

By fire tried,

With Love as our constant guide.

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Mercy Not About Us, Justice Not About Others

But I say to you, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you… — Matthew 5:44, NRSV

We love mercy and we love justice… As long as they benefit us. Don’t get me wrong, we like people who are merciful and just. We admire them and appeal to their example in certain situations. But when it comes to imitating such people (Jesus, for example), that’s when things get a lot more interesting.

As humans, we don’t like being held accountable for our actions. We value forgiveness most when we would prefer to be receiving it. On the other side of the coin, justice is our friend when it comes to those people getting what they deserve.

Jesus has every reason to leave us in the dust and move on. Throughout His entire ministry of healing, teaching, and releasing us from the powers of darkness, He met resistance. He was crucified by those who He came to guide into the way of peace. His followers were persecuted to a frightening degree, and then, once they gained power, the institution that became known as “the Church” embarked on thousands of years filled with good and holy things that were also marred by endless scandal, violence, and abuse.

Even before the Church was established, humans proved to be greedy, violent, and cruel. “But God proves his love for us in that while we still were sinners Christ died for us” (Romans 5:8). This is grace, and it is this merciful grace that is offered to us all still by the One who loved us first.

But it is offered to us all, and we don’t like that. We like when mercy is offered to us, but we deny mercy and forgiveness to those we feel do not deserve it. For example, many of the Christian faith harbor and express hatred for those who follow other faiths (Islam, for example). We feel this way about those who hold different political views or who lead a lifestyle we consider to be inappropriate. Our mercy runs out when it comes to convicted felons, accused persons, and the “lazy” poor who beg for money on street corners. I mean, they’ll just buy drugs with it, right?

All of this judgment is going on in and among people who claim to have experienced the transformative grace and mercy of Jesus Christ… See the disconnect?

If Jesus is our master, and if the God who raised Him from the dead is the One we worship, shouldn’t we embrace their way in our daily lives? Instead of reserving judgment for others, shouldn’t we show mercy as we have been shown mercy, judging ourselves first that we may not come under condemnation?

That’s the way Scripture tells it.

Jesus let’s us know that God is merciful to all, and that is how we ought to be. God “makes his sun rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the righteous and on the unrighteous,” and so we should “Be perfect, therefore, as your heavenly Father is perfect” (Matthew 5:45, 48). This doesn’t mean we will not mess up, but it does mean that, in the end, we choose to act and speak with love, even to those we feel don’t deserve it. It doesn’t mean liking them or condoning their behavior with which we disagree, but it does mean we are opting to show love and forgiveness rather than condemnation.

Paul and Peter carry this teaching forward in their epistles. Paul encourages us to “not repay anyone evil for evil” and to “not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good” (Romans 12:17,21). Further, Paul asks us a haunting question later in 14:4. “Who are you to pass judgment on servants of another?” Judgment is the work of God, for only He can do so justly.

Peter also exhorts his listeners to “not repay evil for evil or abuse for abuse; but, on the contrary, repay with a blessing” (1 Peter 3:9). This is in line with Jesus’ teaching that mercy and forgiveness not be restricted to the “chosen few,” but it is even for our worst enemies. After all, if we, who so often act as enemies of God, are eligible for mercy, who are we to deny that for others?

It is my prayer that we who are the people of God (yes, I include myself in this) will find our way onto the path of Christ. This is a path that is uncomfortable by nature, and it takes practice. We will be growing into our new, eternal life until we depart this life, but the journey itself will be a source of powerful transformation. If we can learn to choose something different, we will experience something different, and I think we can all agree that “different” is something we could use.

Peace be with you!