The Burdens Others Bear

…He sent and had John beheaded in the prison. The head was brought on a platter and given to the girl, who brought it to her mother. — Matthew 14:10-11, NRSV

Oh, goodness, this is an unpleasant text. If you don’t have a Bible handy, this is one of the closing quotes to Matthew’s telling of John the Baptist’s beheading in prison. John criticized Herod and Herodias, the wife of his brother, Phillip, as they had become an “item.” In response to this, John was thrown in prison until his death.

Interestingly enough, John wasn’t immediately killed by Herod or Herodias, despite his prophetic denunciation of their adulterous relationship. Rather, Herodias’ daughter, who has nothing to do with any of this, dances for Herod and pleases him so much that he promises to give her anything she desires (14:7). As you can imagine, this excited young woman rushes to her mother, asking with feverish anticipation, “What should I ask for?” Herodias’ answer must have absolutely crushed her daughter’s spirit, as she used it for her own selfish and sinful revenge.

This poor girl had to go to Herod and ask for the head of a man she didn’t even know. On top of that, she had to carry that head back to her mother. Can you imagine that? How must that girl have felt? Surely it makes you feel a bit sick, and yet we do this sort of thing all the time.

True, we don’t normally have our enemies beheaded and make our kids carry that head around. We do, however, hold on to our anger and hatred to the point that it causes those who care for us to suffer. Our children, spouses, friends, family, and God all get to bear the burden of our selfish need to harbor resentment and anger that may have nothing to do with them. Even if it does, is that the kind of life we want to live? I used to live such a life, so let me go ahead and say that it is definitely not.

Today is a new day, and it is also a new opportunity to start letting go of those deep feelings of hurt, anger, and resentment that you may be harboring. After all, it hurts you and your loved ones more than it could ever hurt the intended subject of your ire. If you don’t feel you struggle with this, take a moment to pray and safeguard your heart against such malice, and spend today more aware of your impulses and emotional reactions to the challenges you face. Should you be someone struggling with this, I hope you will join me in realizing that there is no shame in asking for help. It may take therapy, spiritual counseling, a change in setting, or any number of things, but I promise, the benefit of letting go and trusting everything to God far outweighs the alternative. If we all recognize this, we can honor the suffering of John and this young woman, preventing others we care about from bearing such heavy burdens.

Peace be with you!

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